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Congressional Report: January 22-February 3, 2018

Congressional Report: January 22-February 3, 2018

According to FiveThirtyEight, as of 1/24/18, Sen. Portman votes with Trump 93.4% of time and Rep. Turner votes with Trump 95.3%. 

Representative Mike Turner
Note: Turner is active on Twitter and is on Facebook, in case you want to follow him. Also, on his website, he has photo albums of constituent meetings. According to the website, this page was updated 4 years ago. Surprised?

Major Votes

January 22: Voted Yea on HR 195. Extension of Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018. CONCURRENCE VOTE. It also helps gut Obamacare by: (1) abolishing a 2.3% excise tax on the sale of medical devices in 2018 and 2019 (2) delaying until 2022, an excise tax (the “Cadillac tax”) on high-cost employer health coverage (3) requiring suspension in 2019, of an annual excise tax imposed on health insurers (you know, since they are doing so poorly). Passed (266-150).

January 19: Voted Yea on HR 4712. Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act. Requires certain procedures when an abortion results in a child born prematurely and alive. This bill offers all the rights and protections under the law as any newborn or any person. Passed House (241-183).

January 30: Voted Yea on HR 695. Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2018. The bill passed the defense budget which will end September 30. 2018. This was a concurrence vote. Passed (250-166).

January 29: Rep. Turner, along with Rep. Kuster (D-NH-2), Sen. McCaskill (D-MO), and Sen. Johnson (R-WI), introduced the Improve Data on Sexual Violence Act in the House and the Senate. 

Other Activity

February 2: On the Nunes Memo: “I agree with President Donald J. Trump’s decision to release this information to the American public. We entrust these institutions, the FBI and DOJ, with incredible power. Abuses of these powers are a threat to our democracy and need to be addressed.” FACEBOOK. Mike Turner.

Senator Rob Portman

Major Votes

January 20: Voted Yea in cloture vote involving debate on HR 195. Cloture was NOT invoked (50-49). Note: This was a vote to bring debate on the bill to a quick end. It is the only way the Senate can vote to place a time limit on consideration of a bill and overcome a filibuster. Cloture needs 60 votes and limits consideration of the matter to an additional 30 hours.

January 22: Voted Yea on HR 195. Extension of Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018. It also helps gut Obamacare by: (1) abolishing a 2.3% excise tax on the sale of medical devices in 2018 and 2019 (2) delaying until 2022, an excise tax (the “Cadillac tax”) on high-cost employer health coverage (3) requiring suspension in 2019, of an annual excise tax imposed on health insurers (you know, since they are doing so poorly). Passed Senate (81-18).

January 29: Voted Yea for cloture and supports the Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act which restricts abortions after the 20-week mark. Cloture was NOT invoked (51-46).

January 29: Senator Portman stated that he favored the proposed Protection Child Custody Act which will make it a federal offenseto transport minors across state lines for an abortion if it circumvents a state law that requires parental involvement in the abortion. He has a 100% pro-life voting record.

February 1: Senators Portman and Cardin (D-MD) issued an opinion on the UN Human Rights Council Report compiling an anti- Israel blacklist of businesses. “We strongly oppose the ongoing efforts to compile a blacklist of companies that do business in Israeli-controlled territories.” 22 U.S. companies have been preliminarily identified by UNHRC methodology. The Senators have introduced the Israel Anti-Boycott Act to protect U.S. companies from boycotts and to continue to encourage direct negotiations between the Israelis and Palestinians. They feel the blacklist would seriously hinder continued negotiations.

Other Activity 

February 3: No official statement on his office or Facebook page about the Nunes memo. (On Facebook, there are calls from his constituents for comment.) However, THE BUSINESS JOURNAL reports that the Senator thinks the memo makes “serious allegations” about how FBI and Justice sought the surveillance of a U.S. citizen. He is concerned with the Steele dossier’s accuracy and supports the release of other information pertaining to the memo. He supports disclosing the Democrats’ memo if it does not harm intelligence gathering in the future.

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